Articles from Web Magazine

  • 25.05.11
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    There are no checkpoints on the Internet
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    Social media has taken the credit for the recent revolutions in the Arab world. But Facebook and Twitter alone did not change the world – it was changed by the people who sat at their keyboards and who protested on the streets. One of them is Afrah Nasser – a 25-year-old journalist, activist, feminist and, not least, blogger – who reports daily on the Yemeni revolution. Her blog has been cited by CNN as one of the 10 most important blogs from the Middle East.
  • 25.05.11
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    Tunisian women sense a new political dawn
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    Having tossed out the old regime, Tunisians are now building a brand new democracy from the ground up – with quotas and an equal balance between the genders. But will women gain political power? According to the Danish quota expert and professor Drude Dahlerup, advisor to the Tunisian reform commission, the initiative could be a fantastic success – or it could fail miserably.
  • 14.04.11
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    “The Arabic language is my weapon”
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    If there was just one thing Suad Salem Al-Saba could do for the people of Yemen it would be to provide them with better education. Education empowers people to think freely and make up their minds for themselves. And this deputy head at Sana’a University’s Gender Development Research and Studies Center believes that it is precisely the mindset of the people that needs to be changed if Yemen is to move closer towards equality between men and women. But Suad Salem Al-Saba is much more than deputy head of this centre – she is also a lecturer, a poet, a columnist and a panel judge in a poetry-slam TV show.
  • 13.04.11
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    Au pairs: win-win for women or imported exploitation?
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    An increasing number of Danes are engaging the services of au pairs from the Philippines in order to run their families without compromising on their careers. Some call it a win-win situation; others view it as the exploitation of cheap labour. But what does this popular au pair scheme mean in terms of equality?
  • 28.03.11
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    The day the Tunisian women took a stand
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    They were in the front line of “The Jasmine Revolution:” Young women from the Facebook generation, activist veterans, bourgeoises, intellectuals and working class – they are the ones who are forcing progress in the still-male-dominated Tunisian society. Introducing a group of every-day heroines.
  • 25.03.11
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    Simona and her man-drum
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    Since her teenage years, the Danish-Palestinian percussionist Simona Abdallah has been fighting for her personal freedom. Her journey has taken her through four engagements, two marriages and countless clashes with her family, who have tried to get her to settle down as a good, Arab housewife. But a good Arab housewife is something she has never wanted to be.
  • 21.03.11
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    Fighting child marriages with knowledge spreading
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    The key to progress is the spreading of knowledge – that is the belief of Mirfat Fares Ahed Al Dharhani, librarian at Yemen’s first library for gender, development and research. She met up with KVINFO’s librarian Vibeke Dahm one cold March day in Copenhagen to talk about the challenges facing Yemeni women regarding illiteracy and child marriages.
  • 16.03.11
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    Tahrir Square - battleground for gender equality
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    “In the new Egypt, merely assigning as many women as possible to key posts is not the answer – no, the real answer is about ensuring that those decision-makers who do get assigned to key posts – no matter their gender – set equality and women’s rights firmly at the top of their agenda.” This is the maxim of one of the front-women in the new Egyptian women’s movement.
  • 01.03.11
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    Egypt’s intelligent cyber-amazons
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    In itself, Social media was not responsible for the Egyptian revolution. But what social media did do was enable the world to closely follow the flow of thoughts of those involved at a level never before seen – thoughts about gender, equality and rights being aired from Tahrir Square to the most distant rural districts of the Egyptian motherland.
  • 10.02.11
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    On mapping and agency
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    Working with digital tools to combat the incumbent issue of sexual harassment in the streets adds to the function of technology for social change. But it also raises many thoughts about agency, responsibility and perhaps space appropriation
  • 19.01.11
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    Simple questions and complex answers
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    Egyptian artist Huda Lutfi challenges the media’s stereotypical representations and one-sided portrayals of reality by asking simple questions and by showing images of everyday diversity in Egypt and Denmark. However, she often finds the answers to her simple questions to be highly complex.
  • 19.01.11
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    “There probably aren’t many others like me”
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    She is a rally driver, enjoys paintball and she is the only female managing director in Morocco’s agricultural sector. Meet Chadia Bennis – a career woman with a difference.
  • 19.01.11
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    A helping hand to all women
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    Moroccan businesswomen want to see more women sitting in top positions – and they want to teach other women to read and write. “We want to inspire and change”, tells Ilmam Zhiri, head of Morocco’s first mentoring project and herself a successful top business leader.
  • 12.01.11
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    Jordan’s female parliament representation
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    The women’s movement in Jordan is holding high hopes on the presence of 13 females in the Lower House of Parliament and on the nine women appointed to the Senate by the King to push forward women’s status in the Kingdom after the election November 9th 2010..
  • 09.12.10
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    Women in local government – what does it take?
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    Whether in Jordan, Denmark or Morocco, men outnumber women when in local government. But why? Meet three women who are trying to make a difference by becoming active in politics at a local level.
  • 26.11.10
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    The conditions of domestic workers in the Middle East
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    The legal framework and social practices in Lebanon and Jordan provide employers with a great deal of control over the living and working conditions of migrant domestic workers. However, this leaves these workers with few options when it comes to demanding their rights or seeking protection from and redress for abuse.
  • 21.11.10
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    A shapshot just before the Jordanian election
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    AMMAN – With less than a week to go before the Jordanian parliamentary elections, women’s groups in Jordan have been busy supporting female candidates and calling on women voters to head to the polls and vote for their peers next Tuesday.
  • 23.10.10
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    Improved rights – straight from the pages of the Koran
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    Legislation reforming Morocco’s Family Law passed in 2004 significantly strengthened both the rights of women and the standing of the king. The story behind this legislation is an unusual tale of religion and politics.

In her doctoral thesis, researcher Julie Pruzan-Jørgensen has studied the effects of the Family Law six years after its adoption. For not only is Morocco’s initiative a smart one, she explains, it is also the way forward.
  • 07.10.10
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    Women Bloggers Meet in Cairo
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    “We are in the Middle East. This means something when it comes to what sort of issues women wish to air and the general problems of freedom of speech. But the blogging universe is open for all of us, and not just when it comes to sharing content.” These are the words of the Danish author Merete Pryds Helle reporting from a workshop in Cairo at which 15 enthusiastic bloggers from six different countries met at the end of May 2010.
  • 25.08.10
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    Nuqul – an Arab frontrunner
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    With women estimated to make up 80% of the highly educated workforce in the future, a focus on gender and diversity makes good business sense explains Nicola M. Billeh, HR director at Jordan’s Nuqul Group – one of the Middle East’s largest corporations. And only those companies that have tolerant and accommodating work environments will attract the best talent and therefore achieve the best results.

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