Articles from Web Magazine

  • 10.04.12
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    Support for KVINFOs Mentor Network
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    While Parliamentarians slash support to KVINFO success project, the public supports it wholeheartedly
  • 04.04.12
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    Cutting a swathe through Morocco’s legal jungle
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    The law, both that in writing and that enforced, is one thing – quite another is whether or not the citizens (whom the law is supposed to protect) actually benefit from it. This is a scenario that the legal aid centre in Temara (a neighbourhood on the outskirts of the Moroccan capital Rabat) knows all too well. Here, socioeconomically disadvantaged citizens, who are either unaware of their rights or unaware of how to claim them, can find help.
  • 30.01.12
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    Western feminists and Muslim women in new dialogue
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    The dialogue between western feminists and Muslim women has lost its momentum, according to British law professor and lawyer Maleiha Malik. In order to break the deadlock in the dialogue, we need to find a new common standpoint from which to talk – a standpoint which has not already been occupied by right-wing nationalist rhetoric or others who are interested in maintaining power. WoMen Dialogue brings an interview.
  • 10.01.12
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    Spotlight on sex in Beirut
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    In the autumn of 2011, World Sexual Health Day was marked for the first time ever in the Middle East by the ‘Good Sex/Bad Sex/No Sex/Your Sex’ exhibition held in Beirut, Lebanon. Behind the exhibition, which challenged the idea of sex as a taboo, was 25-year-old Rola Yasmine.
  • 20.12.11
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    Mis(s)representation in the Danish Media
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    The documentary, Miss Representation, exposes how American youth are being sold the concept that women and girls’ value lies in their youth, beauty and sexuality.
  • 29.11.11
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    Sewing their way to independence
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    The women in the Moroccan cooperative Femmes Artisanes Marrakech are proud of being able to contribute to the running of their households with money earned from the sale of their handicrafts. But creating a sustainable business as a self-employed entrepreneur is no easy task – particularly for women in a society that is not used to women running businesses. Together with a group of Danish design students, the women in Marrakech are well on their way to learning just how to do this.
  • 28.10.11
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    Women take a stand against social control
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    Denmark’s refugee and immigrant milieus are witnessing a growing youth and women’s revolt against social control – but there is a flipside. This can be seen in the increasing numbers of young people who are seeking help because they are under pressure from their families or are being subjected to violence. At a debate meeting held in Copenhagen, representatives for the young, practitioners in the field and experts came together to put the development and the problems into perspective.
  • 12.10.11
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    Aalborg University in close contact with male cultures
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    “In order to understand masculinity, we need to look beyond the political equality agenda,” explains Aalborg University professor Ann-Dorte Christiansen.
  • 10.10.11
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    Denmark has got its first woman prime minister ever
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    The election victory won by the social democrat leader Helle Thorning-Schmidt, Denmark’s first woman prime minister, is a historic milestone in the struggle for women’s equality in Denmark. Several experts believe that equality in general will benefit within the country as a result. But amidst all the jubilation, there is also some disappointment. Of the 23 new ministerial appointments, only nine have been given to women, breaking the promise given to Danish women of a government with a 50/50 representation of men and women.
  • 30.09.11
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    A world which has sunk into the sea
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    It became apparent to me that the change in how Kirsten Thorup’s work is read must be a consequence of wider changes in the collective value system – changes that at an international level resulted from the events of September 11, and at a national level were sparked by the new 2001 parliamentary majority in the Danish parliament, which politicians Søren Krarup and Jesper Langballe (with scarcely concealed pride) designated as a ‘complete change of political system change’.
  • 21.09.11
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    A one-way ticket from Iraq to Denmark
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    According to Bayan Salih, many Arab women who do not have a husband behave like a fish out of water. For most of her life, this Danish-Iraqi has worked to make Arab and Kurdish women independent and give them liberation – first and foremost from their own ideas and norms.
  • 12.09.11
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    A front-runner institution
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    In 2010, Denmark is, for the first time, part of the ‘Who Makes the News?’ study – the world’s most comprehensive analysis of gender in the media. The Danish Centre for Information on Gender, Equality and Ethnicity, or KVINFO, together with the Kontrabande consultancy agency, is responsible for the Danish part of the global study, financed by organisations including the Danish state broadcaster Danmarks Radio.
  • 05.09.11
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    Statistics can expose gender gaps in living conditions
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    Do men and women share a level playing field when politicians come up with new legislation or tighten social spending? Official gender statistics are already gathered in both in Jordan and in Denmark, but according to two gender statisticians, if anything is going to change in society, these statistics are to be actually used for something.
  • 05.09.11
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    Taking the Sex Out of Harassment
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    -Honestly, I don’t like feeling like I’m starring in a porn film! These are the words from Jackie Sawiris. She has started the project objecDEFY Harassment - an art-project against sexual harassment in the Middle East – a project that tries to give the voices back to women. These are her reflections upon the project and the ideas behind.
  • 08.07.11
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    Egypt – from revolution to egalitarian democracy
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    Egypt is currently in the middle of a transition period and the time to act is now – particularly in the case of women’s rights. This is according to Amal Abdel Hadi, Egyptian activist and feminist and founder of the Egyptian women’s rights organisation New Woman Foundation. She believes that the fundamental improvements to women’s rights required in the country must be made now, before the will for change has ebbed away.
  • 08.07.11
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    Sex and the City in Saudi Arabia
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    Something new is happening on the Saudi literary scene. Over the past few years the country has witnessed the publication of a torrent of new novels that deal with sex and personal lives – all written by young, well-educated women, highly attuned to the current trends in the West.
  • 28.06.11
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    The necessity of killing Sheherezade
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    Women must have the courage to tell their own stories, rather than pleasing men. This is why Sheherezade must die, tells Lebanese writher Joumana Haddad. WoMen Dialogue spoke with the controversial writer in connection with the Danish-language publication of her book I Killed Sheherezade.
  • 17.06.11
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    Coarse ghetto humour and clichéd Danish stereotypes
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    A false terror accusation against an innocent teenager, vicious high school bullying, and sexual discrimination of the highest order – all set in a ghetto environment. These may not seem obvious ingredients for a refined, astute and hysterically funny book for older children, teens and their parents, but if it all sounds slightly strange, merely open the book ‘Baba Habib – perker* på pletten’ by Kristina Aamand and prepare to be won over.
  • 08.06.11
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    Afghan Hound – the words from an art performance
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    Afghan Hound (2011) is the name of an art performance, staged at the opening of the 2011 Venice Biennale culture festival. KVINFO here publishes the text of the songs sung during the performance with permission from the performance artist, Lilibeth Cuenca Rasmussen.
  • 25.05.11
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    The blogosphere is now our feminist living room
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    “Every day a Middle Eastern woman blogs about her conditions, she changes her life for herself and thousands of other women in the Arabic countries,”, says the American commentator and blogger Mona Eltahawy. She believes that the latest revolutions in Egypt, Libya and Syria – also called the Arab Spring - are, both in their scope and their significance, comparable to the women’s liberation process and movement in the western world during the 1970s.

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