Articles from Web Magazine

  • 10.11.14
    -
    Lebanon – new male images paving the way for equality
    >>
    For the eighth year running, passion, professional knowledge and personal experiences continue to drive American-Lebanese psychologist Anthony Keedi. His gender equality initiative among men focusses on changing the traditional image of the dominant man. A secondary aim of the initiative is to fight violence against women. KVINFO spoke to him about the experiences, challenges and reactions he has met over the years.
  • 10.11.14
    -
    Sexual harassment is an urban phenomenon
    >>
    Everyday sexual harassment shows that a culture of abuse supported by a patriarchical structure can be seen right across the Middle East and North Africa. Because of the unequal power relations between men and women harassment and violence is a part of women’s everyday life – especially in the big cities.
  • 10.11.14
    -
    Yemeni women call for 30% representation
    >>
    In Yemen, women’s organisations have joined forces to voice one unified message: a demand that 30% of all decision-making positions be filled by women. Bilqis Abu-Osba is one of the women behind this coalition. She believes that with a 30% representation Yemen’s women will lead the country towards a more secure future.
  • 09.10.14
    -
    Scheherazade’s daughters are doing things their own way
    >>
    In her debut work Scheherazade’s Daughters, writer Sameena Mughal retells ten stories from the classic 1001 Arabian Nights. Through the transformative magic of narrative, she has turned the gender stereotypes of the historic tales around, making the women the lead characters in their own stories. For Sameena Mughal, Scheherazade is a feminist icon, and she believes that modern Islam has shifted too far away from its original foundations.
  • 09.10.14
    -
    Beirut: Spreading the (free) word across the Middle East
    >>
    Cairo writes, Beirut publishes and Bagdad reads’ – so says an old Arabic adage. Today, Beirut still has a flourishing publishing industry, numbering around 400 independent printing houses. And whilst many countries in the Middle East continue to suffer under repressive state censorship, Lebanon still allows authors to write about the taboo-triangle of sex, religion and politics – something particularly appreciated by the avid women readers of Saudi Arabia.
  • 09.10.14
    -
    “If women were in charge, there would be no war”
    >>
    Syrian artist Sulafa Hijazi fuses the innocence of childhood with symbols from the destructive trappings of war. When people begin to glorify death and begin viewing birth as something trivial, the natural cycles of life and death become an absurd spiral of meaninglessness. In war the standpoint of only one gender holds sway: the masculine’s.
  • 09.10.14
    -
    Egypt’s new anti-harassment law to make a difference?
    >>
    A YouTube video of a woman being sexually assaulted in Tahrir Square during the inauguration celebrations for new Egyptian president Abdul Fattah al-Sisi has again drawn attention to the problems of sexual violence against women in Egypt. For the first time in history the country has a new law criminalising sexual harassment, yet activists remain sceptical as to how effective it will be is if is left to stand on its own.
  • 09.10.14
    -
    Danish local elections seen through new eyes
    >>
    Ideas for new initiatives were conceived and new perceptions of the Danish election system were formed when a group from the Middle East came to Denmark to follow the recently held Danish local elections. And as an added bonus, the group got to see how Denmark deals with a politician who does not have his financial accounts in check.
  • 06.05.14
    -
    Women in politics – a cornerstone of democracy
    >>
    If women want to enter into politics, they require the support of their husband, father brother or family. This is the firm belief of Naderah Rawashdeh, the only woman in Jordan who has been independently elected into a town council without the help of the country’s women’s quota system. She is just one of the women whose lives have turned around after having received political training in one of KVINFO’s partner projects aimed at bringing more women into politics.
  • 06.05.14
    -
    Yemeni photographer: It’s my duty to provoke
    >>
    His photographs are banned in his home country of Yemen; nevertheless, 26-year-old Ibi Ibrahim insists on creating art directed towards the people of Yemen and aimed at reminding them that their lives have not always been as controlled and constrained as they are today.
  • 05.05.14
    -
    Women in Morocco defined by their virtue
    >>
    In the documentary film 457: Break the Silence, debut instructor Hind Bensari depicts how ordinary Moroccans view the issue of rape. Her film uncovers the fact that the commonly held point of view among Moroccans is that if a woman is raped then it is probably her own fault.
  • 02.05.14
    -
    The streets of Egypt are my streets too
    >>
    Combatting sexual violence is top of the agenda for a new generation of Egyptian feminists.
  • 02.05.14
    -
    Moroccan rap is the voice of the people
    >>
    Soultana is the only female rapper in Morocco. Although her lyrics are provocative, she uses her raps to deal with women’s lack of rights and the men’s moral double standards, and when Soultana and her musical partner Anas Basbousi take to the stage they want to show a different image to the world: an image where men and women stand as equals.
  • 10.03.14
    -
    TV Women take to the screen on Nissa TV
    >>
    Women’s history, equality and sexuality are on the line-up when Nissa TV launches across the Mediterranean region and Europe on 8 March. With programming that portrays a realistic picture of women, this new women’s television channel aims to break down stereotypes and challenge perceptions of gender roles.
  • 06.03.14
    -
    Are Danish women the most abused women in Europe?
    >>
    Increased awareness of women’s rights and a decreased tolerance towards violence could explain the surprising results of a new EU report into violence against women. The report, compiled by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Human Rights, FRA, shows that women in Denmark are among the women in Europe most affected by violence. So does the report deflate the myth that there is full equality in Denmark?
  • 21.02.14
    -
    Radio with ‘the woman factor’ is a hit with both women and men
    >>
    Nisaa FM is the only commercial radio station in Palestine producing broadcasts for, by and with women, and the number of those tuning in – both women and men – is on the rise. By challenging media stereotypes, Nisaa FM’s broadcasts provide inspiration as well as encouragement to its listeners.
  • 17.01.14
    -
    Morocco’s Family Code – stage two already underway
    >>
    The Family Code + 10: Experiences and Ways Forward conference has created a new dialogue between the administrative and legal system and the harshest critics.
  • 17.01.14
    -
    A passion for football and equality
    >>
    Football is a universal language. And because of this, Lebanese equal-rights NGO ABAAD has chosen to use the language of football to facilitate the discussion on equality. For both men and boys, football demonstrates the benefits of working as a team; the same is true when men and women play together – whether playing ‘at home’ or ‘away’.
  • 11.12.13
    -
    The Dream Became a Reality: Civil Marriages in Lebanon
    >>
    Khouloud Sukkarieh and Nidal Darwiche have become household names in Lebanon. They are the first Lebanese couple to contract a civil marriage on Lebanese soil.
  • 03.12.13
    -
    Poverty-stricken women of Morocco gaining independence through social entrepreneurship
    >>
    Earning an income is the only way out of poverty according to Moroccan Manal Elattir, social entrepreneur and founder of the design initiative Anarouz. Here, the huge untapped resource of handicraft skills that women living in poverty possess are being put to good use. Through social entrepreneurship and collaboration with designers, the handicrafts of these women become saleable to an international market, providing the women with a way out of poverty and helping to achieve greater social equality.

Pages